Goldendoodle

Updated on 05/04/2021 by Sadie

A cross between a Poodle and a Golden Retriever, the Goldendoodle is perhaps one of the most loving dog breeds out there. Brimming with affection, this breed is an ideal choice for new dog owners who lack any past experience with pups. Highly intelligent and great with kids, the Goldendoodle is the perfect family pet.

Origin & History of Goldendoodles

Considered to be the newest Doodle breed out there, breeding for the Goldendoodle didn’t begin until the 1990s. In crossing the Poodle with the Golden Retriever, breeders hoped to get a pup that would have the classic hypoallergenic qualities such as the low-shedding coat of most Doodle breeds, but be larger in size, more capable in intelligence, and more affectionate and playful around humans, all of which are qualities typically associated with the Golden Retriever. The majority of Goldendoodles, due to their relatively new nature, are first-generation pups, a direct result of breeding between a Poodle and Golden Retriever, with breeding between Goldendoodles not being widespread. The breed is yet to attain official status. However, it has gained immense popularity within the Doodle community.

Personality and Temperament

The beloved status of this dog isn’t one that came about by accident or simply as a result of their adorable looks. The Goldendoodle is one of the most affectionate, loving, and loyal dogs out there. This breed is highly intelligent thanks to its Golden Retriever and Poodle genes and possesses a nature that is incredibly accepting. Due to their gentle and caring nature, as well as their fondness for humans, the Goldendoodle makes a great family pet and is especially great around children. These pups are high on energy and playful, sometimes crossing over into mischievous territory. When looking to bring a Goldendoodle into your home, it’s best to spend time around either the parents or the siblings of your preferred dog to get a good idea of what they might grow up to be like. Socialization is key in ensuring a well-rounded pup so start exposing them to people, other animals, sights, and sounds early on. For extra support, enroll your Goldendoodle in a puppy kindergarten class.

Goldendoodle Size

There really isn’t a standard size when it comes to the Goldendoodle since most of these dogs are a result of first-generation breeding as opposed to multigenerational breeding, and most breeders aren’t looking to create a standard size for the breed. However, on average, the Goldendoodle comes in three sizes. The Miniature Goldendoodle has a Teacup or Toy Poodle parent and weights around 15 to 35 pounds, standing anywhere between 13 to 20 inches tall. The small Standard Goldendoodle has a height and weight of around 17 to 20 inches and 40 to 50 pounds, respectively. Lastly, the large Standard Goldendoodle stands between 30 to 24 inches tall and weighs around 50 to 90 pounds.

Goldendoodle Health

Goldendoodle’s are generally healthy dogs. However, there are some issues that the breed is more prone to than others. When getting a Goldendoodle puppy, try to make sure the breeder has health clearance certificates for the parent dogs. In general, look out for issues such as patellar luxation, which is an issue relating to the kneecaps and is common in small dogs. Stay on the lookout for any ear infections, allergies, or gastrointestinal issues such as bloat. Goldendoodle may develop hypothyroidism, which may lead to issues such as alopecia, lethargy, and epilepsy. Monitor your pup’s health to make sure no such issues are developing.

Goldendoodle Care and Training

The Goldendoodle is largely an indoor dog, not fit for a kennel. However, due to them growing into relatively big dogs, this breed needs a home with ample space to move around, ideally a home with a fenced yard. These pups aren’t the best choice for families or individuals living in apartments. Goldendoodles are a pleasure to train, easily picking up tricks due to their high intelligence as well as their desire to please. When it comes to training, it’s best to use positive reinforcement, steering clear of any harsh punishments since that may damage the confidence of this gentle breed. They require an average amount of exercise, totaling up to around 20 to 30 minutes daily. Incorporate swimming into this pup’s exercise routine since they love being in the water. Goldendoodles prefer to spend time around humans, so it’s best not to leave them on their own for too long since it may result in some destructive behavior caused by separation anxiety.

Feeding

It is recommended to feed them around 1 to 4 cups, depending on the size of your Goldendoodle, of high-quality dry food per day. The best course of action is to speak to a professional to correctly gauge your pup’s nutritional needs and develop a feeding plan accordingly. These dogs should be given several small meals per day as opposed to one big meal to prevent issues such as bloat.

Coat Color, Types, Shedding

Considered a non to light-shedder, the Goldendoodle is the perfect pup for neatniks who don’t like having to clean dog hair from any and all surfaces in their homes. The coat of the Goldendoodle grows to around 2 to 3 inches in length and can be either curly or wavy depending on the Poodle and Golden Retriever genes they inherit. On average, the hair of the Goldendoodle’s head and the muzzle is shorter when compared to the hair on the rest of their body.

Goldendoodle Grooming

This breed really doesn’t require much in the way of grooming. Some people may choose to trim their coat for the purposes of easy maintenance, but the Goldendoodle’s coat can just as easily be left untrimmed. If left untrimmed, it’s best to give the coat a good brushing once every one to two weeks. This breed does not require regular baths, and it is recommended to bathe your Goldendoodle only when it is absolutely necessary since their skin and coat may become stripped of their essential moisture if they are exposed to soap and water too often. Your Goldendoodle’s teeth should be brushed at least twice a week to ensure good oral hygiene and prevent any dental issues. If your dog’s nails don’t naturally wear away, take them to a professional to get their nails trimmed. It is important to seek professional help due to the presence of blood vessels in the Goldendoodle’s nails. Keep checking your dog’s ears to make sure an ear infection isn’t developing and ensure weekly checks for any sores or rashes.

Deciding on a Goldendoodle

The Goldendoodle is a right fit for you if:

  •  You have small children and are on the lookout for a family pet
  • You are looking for a dog that is easy to train
  • You are looking for a hypoallergenic dog

The Goldendoodle is not a right fit for you if:

  • You are looking for a dog that can be kept in a kennel
  • You are looking for a guard dog
  • You live in an apartment or a similar space with limited access to open areas like yards

Getting a Goldendoodle

How Much is a Goldendoodle Puppy?

The high demand for this Doodle breed means that it comes with a hefty price tag. They can cost anywhere between $500 to $4000, depending on whether you choose to buy a puppy from a breeder or adopt a rescue. A Standard Goldendoodle will cost approximately $2000, while the Teacup and Miniature varieties are more expensive.

Goldendoodle Breeders

Rescue and Adoption

Although the Goldendoodle is a “designer breed”, you can find several rescues in shelters across the USA. The following is a list of organizations specializing in Goldendoodle rescue (among other breeds):

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